Sunday, June 25, 2017

Informix Community (new site) / Comunidade Informix (novo site)

A new site dedicated to Informix Community was created. (original version can be seen here: http://informix-technology.blogspot.com/2017/06/informix-community-new-site-comunidade.html)



English version
A new site, called "Informix Community" was created. The team behind it is mainly the one who has been working to develop and deliver you favorite database system. After the move to HCL previously announced, the team seems to be highly motivated and apparently is not saving in efforts to continue their work of delivering you the features and information you need.
The site will hopefully receive contributions from other members in the wider Informix community and for now you can already see some articles.
The site will include some resource links like download locations and other goodies.

Please visit, join and participate!

Versão Portuguesa
Um novo site chamado "Informix Community" foi criado. A equipa por trás disto é basicamente a mesma que tem trabalhado para desenvolver e disponibilizar a sua base de dados favorita. Após a mudança para a HCL, anunciada anteriormente, a equipa parece estar altamente motivada e não está a poupar esforços na continuação do seu trabalho de disponibilização de funcionalidades e informações que todos necessitamos
A página irá certamente receber outros contributos de membros da comunidade alargada Informix, e de momento já disponibiliza alguns artigos.
O site irá incluir alguns recursos como ligações para download e outro tipo de informação útil.
Por favor visite, registe-se e participe!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

IBM and HCL partnership around Informix / Parceria IBM e HCL em torno do Informix

IBM and HCL entering a strategic partnership to jointly develop and market the IBM Informix family of products  (original version here: http://informix-technology.blogspot.com/2017/04/ibm-and-hcl-partnership-around-informix.html)

English version
A statement by Dan Hernandez, VP Offering Management Analytics, available in IBM Data Management Blog and IIUG, explain that IBM and HCL (IT services company based in India) entered a strategic partnership to develop and market Informix products.
As of May 1, HCL will take the development and support of Informix. But until further notice nothing changes from a customer perspective as IBM remains the first point of contact for any customer interaction.
Further information should be provided in the near future, in particular this will be an hot topic in the upcoming IIUG 2017 conference to start this weekend.

This is not the first time that IBM and HCL get into a similar deal. Last year the same happened with Tivoli Workload Automation and a few Rational products.


Versão Portuguesa
Uma declaração de Dan Hernandez, VP Offering Management Analytics, disponível no IBM Data Management Blog e IIUG, explica que a IBM e a HCL (companhia de serviços de IT baseada na India) estableceram uma parceria estratégica para desenvolver e comercializar os produtos Informix.
Em 1 de Maio, a  HCL assumirá o desenvolvimento e suporte do Informix. Mas até mais desenvolvimentos nada mudará na perspectiva dos clientes, visto que a IBM permanece como o primeiro ponto de contato para qualquer interação com os clientes.
Mais informação deverá ser fornecida num futuro próximo, em particular este deverá ser um tema quente da próxima conferência do IIUG (2017) a começar no próximo fim de semana.

Esta não é a  primeira vez que a IBM e a HCL iniciam uma cooperação deste tipo. No ano passado o mesmo se passou com o Tivoli Workload Scheduler e alguns produtos Rational.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

12.10.xC8 and rolling upgrades / 12.10.xC8 e rolling upgrades

Something in english about the article (original version here: http://informix-technology.blogspot.com/2016/12/1210xc8-and-rolling-upgrades-1210xc8-e.html)


English version
IBM published an alert (http://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg21995897) stating that the lastest 12.10 fixpack (xC8) does not support the rolling upgrades feature. A rolling upgrade is the functionality that allows us to upgrade the secondary servers without having to restore them. This is supported only from version major.minor.xCn to major.minor.xCn+1 and when the fixpack does not change physical data structures. Unfortunately that's not the case with 12.10.xC8 as it was needed to make some internal changes to support encryption at rest (EaR).
As such it is clear that rolling upgrades can't be used to upgrade to 12.10.xC8, but that apparently was not clear on the product release notes


Versão Portuguesa
A IBM publicou um alerta (http://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg21995897) informando que o último fixpack (xC8) da versão 12.10 não suporta a funcionalidade de roling upgrade. O rolling upgrade é o que nos permite fazer um upgrade dos servidores secundários sem ter de restaurar a imagem do primário e re-inicializar a replicação. Isto é suportado apenas entre fixpacks consecutivos (V.v.xCn para V.v.xCn+1 e quando o fixpack não muda estruturas físicas. Infelizmente não é o caso do 12.10.xC8 já que foi necessário mudar algumas estruturas para suportar a encriptação de dbspaces.
Como tal é claro que os rolling upgrades não podem ser usados para passar para a 12.10.xC8, mas aparentemente isso não estava claro nas notas da versão.

Monday, December 12, 2016

String truncate. Column level Encryption / Corte de strings. Encriptação de colunas

Truncation of strings and it's impact on column level encryption (original version here: http://informix-technology.blogspot.com/2016/12/string-truncate-column-level-encryption.html)


English version
A recent costumer engagement re-activated a dormant issue on my mind... I've already mentioned this is posts, answers in IIUG mailing list, internal and external chats and discussions... Personally I think this is one of the top annoying things in Informix. I'm referring to the fact that on a non-ANSI informix database we truncate a string on insert if it's length exceeds the length of the field. And we do this silently... no error.
There are two RFEs opened for this (appropriately defined as duplicates). The original one is 33830 and the other (duplicate) is 53804. I've seen several reasons for not implementing this, which I'd like to oppose (again):

  1. It's stated in the ANSI standard that it should work like this
    Although the ANSI standard is hard to read, there are some paragraphs that seem to suggest this. But even if it's clearly stated there, it isn't what people want. This can corrupt data. Anybody would prefer an error.
    Additionally we don't truncate on ANSI mode databases.
  2. We would be changing previous behavior
    True. But that could be an option and by default we could keep the old behavior. The author of the RFE suggests a new parameter in $ONCONFIG. That is an option, but I'd prefer also an option on CREATE DATABASE (we already introduced an option for NLSCASE SENSITIVE). Ideally we would have a new ALTER DATABASE to change it. The $ONCONFIG parameter could and should be used to set the default (if the option was not specified on the CREATE DATABASE statement).
    I would not create a new $ONCONFIG parameter. I'd prefer having more options on the EILSEQ_COMPAT_MODE parameter which already controls functionality around the same topic.
  3. It would be hard to implement
    Having basic programming knowledge and considering we don't do this for ANSI mode databases (see test below), I doubt this would be too hard to implement. Somehow I can imagine a piece of current code like

    if ( ANSI_MODE_FLAG && length(input) > col_length)
          raise_exception(1279);

    which would become:

    if ((ANSI_MODE_FLAG || AVOID_TRUNCATE_FLAG) && length(input) > col_length)
          raise_exception(1279);

    ANSI_MODE_FLAG and AVOID_TRUNCATE_FLAG are assumed to be flags set from the logging mode and from the database (or session) options
  4. That's not a database problem. The application must check it's inputs
    Although I can agree with the idea that applications should check the inputs, I know many of them don't check the length. And as we don't silently truncate a big number (100000 for example) when inserted into a SMALLINT column, I can't understand why we do it with strings. The database must help keeping data integrity. And it fails doing that for strings
As mentioned before we don't truncate strings on ANSI mode database. Here's what happens:

castelo@primary:informix-> dbaccess -e stores_ansi test_ansi_truncate.sql

Database selected.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test;
Table dropped.


CREATE TABLE test
(
        col1 CHAR(5)
);
Table created.



INSERT INTO test VALUES('123456');
 1279: Value exceeds string column length.
Error in line 7
Near character position 32


  377: Must terminate transaction before closing database.

  853: Current transaction has been rolled back due to error 
or missing COMMIT WORK.

castelo@primary:informix->

Why don't we simply use ANSI mode databases? Well... They have other limitations (can't use datablades) and conversion of existing ones would require application changes.

Ok... so string truncation is a problem by itself. But this article is about a specially complex and nasty effect of string truncation.
Users looking into column level encryption will notice that the encrypted form of the data will be stored in a character column. And the encryption process will "enlarge" the length of the data. Even more complex, the length of encrypted data depends on various factors. The initial number of "characters" (or digits) is one. Others are if it uses hint or not and the encryption algorithm. Below is a table from the manual that maps the "N" original digits/characters to the final result depending on the algorithm and usage of the hint:



N
ENCRYPT_TDES
No Hint
ENCRYPT_AES
No Hint
ENCRYPT_TDES
With Hint
ENCRYPT_AES
With Hint
1 to 7
35
43
87
99
8 to 15
43
43
99
99
16 to 23
55
67
107
119
24 to 31
67
67
119
119
32 to 39
75
87
131
139
40 to 47
87
87
139
139
100
163
171
215
227
200
299
299
355
355
500
695
707
747
759


The previous values can be calculated using the following formulae (again, accordingly to the manual):
  • Encryption by ENCRYPT_TDES( ) with no hint:
    Encrypted size = (4 x ((8 x((N + 8)/8) + 10)/3) + 11)
  • Encryption by ENCRYPT_AES( ) with no hint:
    Encrypted size = (4 x ((16 x((N + 16)/16) + 10)/3) + 11)
  • Encryption by ENCRYPT_TDES( ) with a hint:
    Encrypted size = (4 x ((8 x((N + 8)/8) + 50)/3) + 11)
  • Encryption by ENCRYPT_AES( ) with a hint:
    Encrypted size = (4 x ((16 x((N + 16)/16) + 50)/3) + 11)
The integer division ( / ) returns an integer quotient and discards any remainder.

So, effectively, using the above calculations it should be possible to validate if the value inserted by the user would fit a specific column length. But that would have to be implemented for each column. Could introduce some errors, and would make it impossible to implement column level encryption without changing the application, which is otherwise almost possible (the only change is to provide a password at the session level, if that fits the use case).

And after all this discussion, what is the problem in truncating the strings in this context? Pretty simply it will make it impossible to decrypt the data, so effectively it corrupts data in an unrecoverable way. There's no way to overstate this. An application, application developer or a DBA cannot afford to have that risk. As I usually say when I'm discussing this, if  we loose a few characters of a name, email address, or street address, it's possible that a human can recover the missing data by looking at what is left. But with column level encryption even the loss of a single character means the data is lost. Not something we want to deal with, or have to explain to business managers.
What can we do? We could start by opening a bunch of PMRs and link them to the RFEs above... but apart from pressing IBM there's actually something very easy we can do to solve this for the very strict context of column level encryption.
As mentioned, recently I had a customer who is concerned with the upcoming EU data protection regulations and is considering their options to address the requirements in that new compliance challenge. One of the options is to use column level encryption, but they were highly concerned with the above scenario. So I gave this matter a considerable thought and I think I came up with a relatively reasonable workaround (although I hate to be forced to deal with this in the first place).

The solution is elegant, relatively lightweight, doesn't require any extra application changes and hopefully should be able to avoid the nasty hypotheses of data loss or corruption.
My first approach was to implement a trigger, and try to verify if the input data would fit the column. I quickly realized that the data as seen by the trigger is already truncated, so the approach would not work. But at that same moment it became clear that another approach would work: If the data is already truncated (or not, depending on the sizes of course), all I had to do was try to decrypt it. If the data was actually truncated, it would raise an error. And if I try that within a trigger, the triggering operation will naturally fail, which if the intended outcome. You can check the code at the end of the article.
Trying to decrypt the data would have the following problems:
  1. It would be expensive in terms of CPU resources
  2. If the data has been encrypted with a specific password passed to the encrypt functions (ENCRYPT_AES() or ENCRYPT_TDES() ), I would not be able to DECRYPT_CHAR(), without knowing the password
A solution to both of this problems is to use the GETHINT() function. It apparently is less expensive than DECRYPT_CHAR and at the same time doesn't require the password. So it will work in either cases (password at session level or password at function level). It will also "work" even if no hint was provided. Most importantly it will fail if data truncation had happened.

So basically I need to create a procedure that receives the encrypted data, apply the GETHINT() and let the magic happen. This procedure should be called from triggers set on the column/table (INSERT and UPDATE) that pass the "new" values as parameter. I choose to use LVARCHAR(32000) as it should cover most use cases. Smart blob encryption was not considered. In those cases we don't have a size limit...
The code is shown at the end of the article. Let's see what happens when we run it:


bica@primary:fnunes-> dbaccess -e stores test_truncate.sql 

Database selected.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test_encrypt;
Table dropped.


CREATE TABLE test_encrypt
(
        col1 SERIAL,
        col2 CHAR(43)
);
Table created.



SET ENCRYPTION PASSWORD 'blog_password';
Encryption password set.



DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS check_encryption;
Routine dropped.


CREATE PROCEDURE check_encryption(str LVARCHAR(32000))
        DEFINE dummy CHAR(32);;

        SELECT GETHINT(str) INTO dummy FROM sysmaster:sysdual;;
END PROCEDURE;
Routine created.

;

CREATE TRIGGER i_test_encrypt INSERT ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);
Trigger created.



CREATE TRIGGER u_test_encrypt UPDATE OF col2 ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);
Trigger created.



INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 1'));
1 row(s) inserted.


INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 2'));
1 row(s) inserted.

 

INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!'));
26005: The encrypted data is wrong or corrupted.
Error in line 32
Near character position 1


UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!') WHERE col1 = 1;
26005: The encrypted data is wrong or corrupted.
Error in line 34
Near character position 1

UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This fits!') WHERE col1 = 2;
1 row(s) updated.



Database closed.

bica@primary:fnunes->

So, as can be seen, I created a table with a column (col2) defined as CHAR(43) which won't be enough for some data I'll try to INSERT/UPDATE.
Then I setup the session encryption password. I create the procedure and the triggers on the table.
And I move on to the DML. The first two INSERTs use short values and they work. The third INSERT uses a longer string which encrypted version won't fit col2. It raises an error 26005. Then I try a similar string but within an UPDATE and I face the same error. And an update with short length works.

I believe this is a simple, clean and robust solution for this problem. But as usual, use it at your own risk. And don't forget this is a workaround for a specific scenario (column level encryption) to overcome a problem I believe should not exist in the first place.



Versão Portuguesa
Uma visita recente a um cliente reavivou um assunto que andava adormecido na minha mente... Já mencionei isto em artigos, respostas na lista de discussão do IIUG, conversas e discussões internas e externas... Pessoalmente penso que é uma das coisas mais irritantes no Informix. Refiro-me ao facto de que numa base de dados não-ANSI, o Informix corta strings na inserção e alteração se o comprimento das mesmas exceder o tamanho da coluna. E tal acontece de forma silenciosa. Sem erro.
Existem dois RFEs abertos para isto (apropriadamente detetados como duplicados). O original é o 33830 e o outro (duplicado) é o 53804. Já me foram sugeridas várias razões para a não implementação disto, as quais uma vez mais gostaria de refutar:
  1. É referido que o standard ANSI sugere que este é o comportamento correto
    Embora o standard ANSI seja difícil de ler, existem alguns parágrafos que parecem sugerir isto. Mas mesmo que fosse claro, existem contra-argumentos para isto. Ainda que seja o standard, não é o que as pessoas querem. Isto pode corromper dados. Qualquer pessoa preferirá um erro. Adicionalmente e paradoxalmente nós não fazemos o corte em bases de dados criadas em modo ANSI
  2. Estaria a mudar-se o comportamento anterior
    Verdade. Mas isto poderia ser uma opção e por omissão manter-se o comportamento antigo. O autor do RFE sugere um parâmetro no $ONCONFIG. Seria uma opção, mas eu preferiria também uma opção no CREATE DATABASE (já introduzimos uma opção para NLSCASE SENDITIVE). Idealmente deveríamos também ter um novo ALTER DATABASE para mudar a opção. O parâmetro do $ONCONFIG poderia e deveria ser usado como a definição por omissão (se a opção não fosse especificada no CREATE DATABASE).
    Pessoalmente não criaria um novo parâmetro, mas antes daria novos valores possíveis ao parâmetro EILSEQ_COMPAT_MODE, que já controla funcionalidades em torno deste tópico
  3. Seria difícil de implementar
    Tendo conhecimentos básicos de programação, e considerando que já hoje nós não cortamos as strings em bases de dados criadas em modo ANSI (ver o teste abaixo), duvido que isto fosse muito complexo de implementar. De alguma forma imagino um pedaço de código atual semelhante a:

    if ( ANSI_MODE_FLAG && length(input) > col_length)
          raise_exception(1279);

    que deveria tornar-se:

    if ((ANSI_MODE_FLAG || AVOID_TRUNCATE_FLAG) && length(input) > col_length)
          raise_exception(1279);

    ANSI_MODE_FLAG é assumido que será uma flag dependente do mode de logging da base de dados e AVOID_TRUNCATE_FLAG seria dependente da opção de criação da base de dados ou do parâmetro no $ONCONFIG
  4. Isto não é um problema de base de dados. A aplicação tem de validar os seus inputs
    Embora tenha de concordar com a ideia que as aplicações devem validar os seus inputs, sei que muitas delas não verificam o comprimento das strings ou fazem-no pelas definições de estruturas de dados. E se não cortamos de forma silenciosa um número grande (como 100000) ao tentar inserir num SMALLINT, não consigo entender porque o fazemos com strings. A base de dados tem como função essencial assegurar a integridade dos dados, de acordo com as definições dos mesmos. E falha quando se trata de o fazer em strings.
Como mencionado acima, nós não cortamos strings em bases de dados criadas em modo ANSI. Vejamos o que acontece:

castelo@primary:informix-> dbaccess -e stores_ansi test_ansi_truncate.sql

Database selected.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS teste;
Table dropped.


CREATE TABLE teste
(
        col1 CHAR(5)
);
Table created.



INSERT INTO teste VALUES('123456');
 1279: Value exceeds string column length.
Error in line 7
Near character position 32


  377: Must terminate transaction before closing database.

  853: Current transaction has been rolled back due to error 
or missing COMMIT WORK.

castelo@primary:informix->

Porque não passamos simplesmente a usar bases de dados em modo ANSI? Bem.... têm outras limitações (não podem usar datablades) e isso requereria mudanças no código das aplicações.

Ok... Então o corte de strings é um problema em si mesmo. Mas este artigo é sobre um efeito complexo e devastador desse corte.
Utilizadores que estejam a considerar o uso de encriptação de colunas, verificarão que a forma encriptada dos dados deverá ser guardada numa coluna com um tipo de dados alfa-numéricos (CHAR ou uma variante). E saberão também que o processo de encriptação fará "crescer" o tamanho dos dados. Ainda mais complicado, o tamanho dos dados encriptados dependerá de vários fatores: O número de caracteres (alfa-numéricos) originais é um desses fatores. Outros serão se se usa ou não uma hint, e o algoritmo de encriptação. Abaixo está uma tabela retirada do manual que mapeia o número original de dígitos / caracteres com o tamanho final, dependendo do algoritmo usado e da utilização ou não de hint:


N
ENCRYPT_TDES
No Hint
ENCRYPT_AES
No Hint
ENCRYPT_TDES
With Hint
ENCRYPT_AES
With Hint
1 to 7
35
43
87
99
8 to 15
43
43
99
99
16 to 23
55
67
107
119
24 to 31
67
67
119
119
32 to 39
75
87
131
139
40 to 47
87
87
139
139
100
163
171
215
227
200
299
299
355
355
500
695
707
747
759


Os valores anteriores podem ser calculados com as seguintes fórmulas (de acordo com o manual):
  • Encriptação com ENCRYPT_TDES( ) sem hint:
    Tamanho dados encriptados = (4 x ((8 x((N + 8)/8) + 10)/3) + 11)
  • Encriptação com ENCRYPT_AES( ) sem hint:
    Tamanho dados encriptados = (4 x ((16 x((N + 16)/16) + 10)/3) + 11)
  • Encriptação com ENCRYPT_TDES( ) com hint:
    Tamanho dados encriptados = (4 x ((8 x((N + 8)/8) + 50)/3) + 11)
  • Encriptação com ENCRYPT_AES( ) com hint:
    Tamanho dados encriptados= (4 x ((16 x((N + 16)/16) + 50)/3) + 11)
A divisão inteira ( / ) retorna um quociente inteiro descartando qualquer resto.

Portanto, efetivamente usando os cálculos acima deverá ser possível validar se um valor inserido por um utilizador caberá numa determinada coluna depois de encriptado. Mas isto teria de ser implementado para cada coluna. Poderia introduzir alguns erros, e tornaria impossível implementar a encriptação de colunas sem mudar a aplicação, o que de outra forma seria praticamente possível (a única alteração necessária seria o providenciar uma password de encriptação ao nível de sessão, se tal for permitido pelo caso de uso).

E depois de toda esta discussão, qual é o problema em cortar strings neste contexto? Muito simplesmente, tornará impossível efetuar a desencriptação, pelo que efetivamente tal situação corrompe dados de forma irrecuperável. Não há forma de exagerar esta conclusão. Uma aplicação, um programador ou um DBA não podem dar-se ao luxo de correr esse risco. Como habitualmente digo quando estou a discutir este assunto, se perdermos uns poucos caracteres de um nome, um endereço de correio ou endereço postal, é possível que um ser humano possa recuperar os dados cortados através da consulta do que sobrou. Mas com encriptação de colunas, mesmo a perda de um só carater implica que os dados estejam perdidos. Não é coisa com que queiramos lidar ou que tenhamos de explicar a pessoas responsáveis pelo negócio.
Então o que podemos fazer? Podíamos começar por abrir um rol de PMRs e ligá-los a este RFE acima., mas para além de pressionarmos a IBM, existe algo que efetivamente podemos fazer para resolver o contexto estrito de encriptação de colunas.
Como mencionado, recentemente tive contacto com um cliente que está preocupado com a nova regulação de proteção de dados da EU e está a considerar as opções que têm neste novo desafio de compliance. Uma das opções que têm é usar encriptação do nível da coluna, mas estavam altamente preocupados com o cenário acima. Por causa disso dediquei um considerável esforço ao tema e penso que cheguei a uma forma de contornar o problema (embora odeie ter de lidar com tal situação).

A solução é elegante, relativamente leve, não requer nenhuma modificação na aplicação e espero que esteja à altura de evitar a terrível hipótese de perda de dados ou corrupção.

A minha primeira abordagem foi implementar um trigger e tentar verificar se os dados de input (encriptados) caberiam na coluna. Rapidamente me apercebi que o trigger já vê os dados "cortados", pelo que a abordagem não resultaria. Mas no mesmo momento ficou claro que outra abordagem semelhante resultaria: se os dados já estão potencialmente "cortados", tudo o que deveria fazer seria desencriptá-los. Se tivessem sido efetivamente cortados isto despoletaria um erro. E se tal acontecer dentro de um trigger então a operação que despoletou o trigger iria por arrasto falhar. Pode verificar o código no final do artigo. Tentar desencriptar os dados levantaria os seguintes problemas::
  1. Seria dispendioso em termos de recursos de CPU
  2. Se os dados tivessem sido encriptados com uma password especifica passada às funções de encriptação (ENCRYPT_AES() or ENCRYPT_TDES() ), não seria capaz de efetuar a desencriptação sem saber a password
A solução para ambos estes problemas é usar a função GETHINT(). Deverá ser menos exigente em termos de CPU que a DECRYPT_CHAR() e tem a vantagem de não necessitar de password. Deverá portanto funcionar em ambos os casos (passwords ao nível da sessão e ao nível das funções). Irá também funcionar mesmo que não tenha sido utilizada nenhuma hint. Mas o verdadeiramente importante é que falhará se os dados tiverem sido corrompidos.

Assim, basicamente o que necessito é criar um procedimento que recebe os dados encriptados e aplica o GETHINT(), e deixar a magia acontecer. O procedimento deve ser chamado por triggers definidos na coluna / tabela (INSERT e UPDATE), que passam os "novos" valores como parâmetro
Escolhi o LVARCHAR(32000) como tipo do parâmetros dado que deverá cobrir a maioria dos casos. A encriptação de Smart Blobs não foi considerada. Até porque nesses casos não temos um limite de tamanho...
O código está visível no final do artigo. Vejamos o que acontece quando o corremos:


bica@primary:fnunes-> dbaccess -e stores test_truncate.sql 

Database selected.

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test_encrypt;
Table dropped.


CREATE TABLE test_encrypt
(
        col1 SERIAL,
        col2 CHAR(43)
);
Table created.



SET ENCRYPTION PASSWORD 'blog_password';
Encryption password set.



DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS check_encryption;
Routine dropped.


CREATE PROCEDURE check_encryption(str LVARCHAR(32000))
        DEFINE dummy CHAR(32);;

        SELECT GETHINT(str) INTO dummy FROM sysmaster:sysdual;;
END PROCEDURE;
Routine created.

;

CREATE TRIGGER i_test_encrypt INSERT ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);
Trigger created.



CREATE TRIGGER u_test_encrypt UPDATE OF col2 ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);
Trigger created.



INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 1'));
1 row(s) inserted.


INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 2'));
1 row(s) inserted.

 

INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!'));
26005: The encrypted data is wrong or corrupted.
Error in line 32
Near character position 1


UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!') WHERE col1 = 1;
26005: The encrypted data is wrong or corrupted.
Error in line 34
Near character position 1

UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This fits!') WHERE col1 = 2;
1 row(s) updated.



Database closed.

bica@primary:fnunes->

Como se pode ver, crio uma tabela com uma coluna (col2) definida como CHAR(43) e que não será suficiente para alguns dados que irei tentar inserir/alterar.
Depois estabeleço a password de sessão. Crio o procedimento e os triggers na tabela. E passo ao DML. Os primeiros dois INSERTs usam valores curtos e vão funcionar. O terceiro INSERT usa uma string mais longa, cuja versão encriptada não cabe na coluna col2. Despoleta um erro 26005. Depois tento uma string semelhante  mas via um UPDATE e encontramos o mesmo erro. Depois um UPDATE "curto" e funciona
Acredito que isto é simples, "limpo" e robusto para resolver o problema. Mas como é habitual, utilize por sua conta, peso e risco. E relembro que isto é uma forma de contornar um problema que penso que nunca deveria ter acontecido, num contexto específico que é a encriptação de colunas.


Code/Código


DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test_encrypt;
CREATE TABLE test_encrypt
(
        col1 SERIAL,
        col2 CHAR(43)
);

SET ENCRYPTION PASSWORD 'blog_password';

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS check_encryption;
CREATE PROCEDURE check_encryption(str LVARCHAR(32000))
        DEFINE dummy CHAR(32);

        SELECT GETHINT(str) INTO dummy FROM sysmaster:sysdual;
END PROCEDURE;

CREATE TRIGGER i_test_encrypt INSERT ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);

CREATE TRIGGER u_test_encrypt UPDATE OF col2 ON test_encrypt REFERENCING NEW AS new_data
FOR EACH ROW
(
        EXECUTE PROCEDURE check_encryption(new_data.col2)
);

INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 1'));
INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('Row 2'));

INSERT INTO test_encrypt VALUES(0, ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!'));

UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This longer row will probably not fit!') WHERE col1 = 1;
UPDATE test_encrypt SET col2 = ENCRYPT_AES('This fits!') WHERE col1 = 2;